Plant info

Meadow Knapweed: Wildflower Wednesday

– Posted in: Native/Invasive
featured-image-meadow-knapweed

Do you remember when I waded through botanical terminology to identify my wild rose? Well, I've been at it again. Earlier this week, a pretty lilac-blue flower along the side of the road caught my eye, and I wanted to know what it was. It was pretty enough to be a garden plant, but I [...]

Water Hemlock: Wildflower Wednesday

– Posted in: Native/Invasive
water hemlock featured image

A couple of weeks ago, my thirty-something daughter was busy gathering wildflowers for her brother's wedding. "Mom, do you know what that plant is?" There it was, growing in our backyard along the creek. I am pretty sure it has been there ever since we moved in almost five years ago. But no, I didn't [...]

My Spicebush Is Blooming! Wildflower Wednesday April 2016

– Posted in: Native/Invasive, The Secret Garden, What's up/blooming
Spicebush featured image

My spicebush is blooming! Only a mother--I mean, a gardener--could be so happy about the blessed event. See: Well--ahem--yes, they are rather small. Try this:Okay, let's really zoom in: I saw my first spicebushes in 2009 in the Mundy Wildflower Garden on the grounds of Cornell Plantation in Ithaca, New York. There were several of [...]

The Earliest Blooming Native Flower

– Posted in: Mud Season, Native/Invasive
red maple featured image

The earliest blooming flower in my garden is a snowdrop, Galanthus 'S. Arnott'. The earliest blooming wild flower is coltsfoot. But the earliest blooming native flower? For that, you have to look up. Way up. Because the earliest blooming native flower belongs to the red maple, Acer rubrum. I am always looking down at the [...]

Tartarian Honeysuckle Chokes Out Spring Ephemerals

– Posted in: Garden chores, Mud Season, Native/Invasive
Tartarian Honeysuckle featured image

One lesson I learned from Sara Stein, author of Noah's Garden and Planting Noah's Garden, was that non-native (also called alien) plants typically start growing and blooming before the native plants--at least in North America. That is because the climate they originally came from was milder, or warmed up gradually and consistently, and that is [...]