Narcissus poeticus ©Cadence PurdyTrillium grandiflorum ©Rundy PurdyGaywings (Polygala paucifolia) ©Cadence PurdyNarcissus 'Vernal Prince' ©Kathy PurdyPink Lady's Slippers (Cypripridium acaule) ©Kathy PurdyDandelion (Taraxacum officinale) ©Justin PurdySpring view at the old house. ©Cadence PurdyA bouquet of gaywings (Polygala paucifolia) ©Cadence PurdyVirginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica) ©Kathy PurdyBlue flax (Linum perenne) ©Cadence PurdyApple blossoms at the old house. ©Rundy Purdy

Welcome to Cold Climate Gardening

I’m so glad to have you visit! If you are looking for help gardening in a challenging cold or short-season climate, you’ve come to the right place! Gardening in a cold climate isn’t more difficult than growing in other climates, as long as you grow plants suited to the climate and the soil. We’ve got pages of information–check out the menus above, browse the archives, or take advantage of the search box in the sidebar to the right. I’m Kathy Purdy, and I do most of the writing here, and we also have some excellent guest authors. We’d love to hear from you in the comments or the contact page.

Good Fall Is Here! Garden Bloggers Bloom Day September 2017

In my mind there are two kinds of fall: "Good" Fall and "Bad" Fall. Good Fall is what we have now. The leaves on the trees are starting to turn color, temperatures have moderated so that you want to work in the garden again, the colchicums have started blooming and the many native autumn-blooming plants are at their peak, summer annuals are still going strong and some perennials are having a second flush of bloom. (Bad Fall is after the leaves drop and it's cold enough that they'd call it winter down South.) In this blog post, I'd like to share some of the best that autumn has to offer.