Horticulture Magazine jumps on the blogging bandwagon

– Posted in: Blogging Art and Practice, Recommended Links
7 comments

Horticulture Magazine has jumped on the blogging bandwagon. Managing Editor Meghan Lynch and Executive Editor Sara Begg are both giving it a whirl. At the moment, though, you can’t get to them from the website’s main page. How dumb is that? The only reason I even found them is because I subscribe to the email newsletter. Since they’re just getting started, I expect a link will be up there shortly.

You might say Meghan discovered me. She (anonymously) wrote a sidebar praising this blog in the spring of 2005, and offered me the chance to write the book reviews for the April 2006. I’ve been writing for Horticulture off and on ever since, though all my recent work has been for the regional edition. (My next piece will be in the July NE edition.)

Meg confessed to feeling a bit nervous, so I hope you’ll stop by and make her feel welcome. And tell her Kathy sent you!

About the Author

Kathy Purdy is a colchicum evangelist, converting unsuspecting gardeners into colchicophiles. She would be delighted to speak to your group about colchicums or other gardening topics. Kathy’s been writing since 4th grade, gardening since high school, and blogging since 2002.

What differentiates a bulb from a perennial plant is that the nourishment for the flower is stored within the bulb itself.…There is something miraculous about the way that a little grenade of dried up tissue can explode into a complete flower.

~Monty Don in The Complete Gardener pp. 142

Comments on this entry are closed.

Hiroshi Sunairi May 25, 2009, 9:43 pm

I am doing an art project, in which I give out seeds of trees that survived the atomic bombing in Hiroshima to the people of US and the world. If you are interested, come see my blog and I can send you the seeds.http://treeproject.blogspot.com

Hiroshi Sunairi’s last blog post..Sabine Vockins planted Persimmon and Jujube seeds on Memorial Day

Joan Chantler June 10, 2008, 4:11 pm

Dear Editor or Kathy Purdy –

Save the Butterflies – I’m trying to send this as a letter to the editor but it bounced back. I’ll try snail mail I guess. In the meantime, I’d like to stir up some discussion, and elict some further information.

I hope someone more knowledgeable than I am has already sent in a response to your Q & A article on
Tomato Hornworms. In it you recommend using Bt to control the Hornworm, noting that it “targets only
lepidoptera and spares the benficial wasps.” The genus Lepidoptera includes both moth and
butterflies! On behalf of all of us who enjoy these colorful sprites flitting through our gardens,
or who perhaps even take pains to grow butterfly enticing flowers, I say let’s carefully weigh the
costs and benefits here.

True, as the song points out, there are only two thing money can’t buy: true love and a homegrown
tomato! However, Robert Pyle points out in Butterflies of Cascadia, “. . .some new threats have
arisen to our Lepidoptera heritage. Perhaps the most alarming among these is the aerial application
of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis kurstacki . . .Studies at Oregon State University suggest
widespread suscpetibility among non-target butterflies and moths to this pathogen.” He references
Guppy and Shepard (2001) for further information, but I don’t have further time.

In addition, our Spinx moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, is an amazing being. Let us be aware of the
consequences of our actions and the need for full information. Responses and clarifications
welcome.
Joan Chantler 1009 Snowden Road White Salmon, WA. 98672 509-493-1976 or 509-748-2551 or 541-980-
5203 cell

Joan Chantler June 10, 2008, 4:09 pm

Dear Editor or Kathy Purdy –

Save the Butterflies – I’m trying to send this as a letter to the editor but it bounced back. I’ll try snail mail I guess. In the meantime, I’d like to stir up some discussion, and elict some further information.

I hope someone more knowledgeable than I am has already sent in a response to your Q & A article on
Tomato Hornworms. In it you recommend using Bt to control the Hornworm, noting that it “targets only
lepidoptera and spares the benficial wasps.” The genus Lepidoptera includes both moth and
butterflies! On behalf of all of us who enjoy these colorful sprites flitting through our gardens,
or who perhaps even take pains to grow butterfly enticing flowers, I say let’s carefully weigh the
costs and benefits here.

True, as the song points out, there are only two thing money can’t buy: true love and a homegrown
tomato! However, Robert Pyle points out in Butterflies of Cascadia, “. . .some new threats have
arisen to our Lepidoptera heritage. Perhaps the most alarming among these is the aerial application
of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis kurstacki . . .Studies at Oresong State Universtiy suggest
widespread suscpetibility among non-target butterflies and moths to this pathogen.” He references
Guppy and Shepard (2001) for further information, but I don’t have further time.

In addition, our Spinx moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, is an amazing being. Let us be aware of the
consequences of our actions and the need for full information. Responses and clarifications
welcome.
Joan Chantler 1009 Snowden Road White Salmon, WA. 98672 509-493-1976 or 509-748-2551 or 541-980-
5203 cell

Douglas E. Welch February 2, 2007, 8:02 pm

Will do. I will try again. We should probably send a friendly note to them requesting an easier method of subscribing, too.

Thanks for the info!

D

Kathy Purdy February 2, 2007, 7:04 am

Doug, right after I posted this entry I attempted to subscribe with Bloglines with no success. This morning I entered the url of the blog’s website, not the url for the feed, into Bloglines and chose subscribe, and it found the feed. There is something in the meta if you view source. It’s not a link to the feed, but some kind of command that will execute.

I’m with you: if there’s no feed, I won’t visit. I just don’t remember otherwise.

Douglas E. Welch February 1, 2007, 8:36 pm

Did you notice any RSS links for the blogs? I didn’t and my attempt to do an automatic subscribe failed in NetNewsWire. This means their template doesn’t have any META tags pointing to a feed.

Without RSS feeds there would be no way I could keep up with them.

Douglas

Eliz February 1, 2007, 2:05 pm

Kathy, I have answered the question you posted on Garden Rant. Now you have my email, so feel free to follow-up using that.