Spring Can Come Now!

– Posted in: Seeds and Seed Starting
3 comments

All of my seeds are here, so now Spring can come. In fact, I’m beginning to get impatient now. . .

Fedco had to substitute my Amish pepper for a similar variety. . .I guess a lot of people liked their discription! The things they had to substitute were cheaper, so they also sent two dimes in with the order. I can’t say I ever had great plans for those two dimes, but I won’t complain about getting them back!

My first batch of leeks (Sherwood, which won’t overwinter) is about 3 inches tall. This weekend I start my next batch of leeks. I think they’re called “Imperial”; I’ve never tried them before. I just got them in my Fedco order, otherwise I would have started them at the same time as the Sherwood. The “Imperial” can overwinter.

March, as is typical around here, came in like lion, is still acting like a lion, and probably won’t be tired of acting like a lion by the time it leaves. But the sun is up when I get up in the morning, and we aren’t eternally covered in thick layer of clouds, so I feel like there is hope for Spring.

About the Author

Talitha spent the last few years doing an absurd combination of work and school, and found it wasn’t very pleasant. Now she’s doing work, school and a garden, and life is a little better! She also enjoys photography and hand feeding her ducks. USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 AHS Heat Zone: 3 Location: rural; Southern Tier of NY Geographic type: foothills of Appalachian Mountains Soil Type: acid clay Experience level: advanced beginner Particular interests: herbs, vegetables, cutting garden, cottage gardening

In the end, this may be the most important thing about frost: Frost slows us down. In spring, it tempers our eagerness. In fall, it brings closure and rest. In our gotta-go world–where every nanosecond seems to count–slowness can be a great gift. So rather than see Jack Frost as an adversary, you could choose to greet him as a friend.

~Philip Harnden in A Gardener’s Guide to Frost: Outwit the Weather and Extend the Spring and Fall Seasons

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Talitha March 23, 2005, 6:47 pm

Gabrielle–maybe I am a teensy bit tired of March! Actually, I have been a lot more cheerful since we started getting longer days–the first real sign of Spring. Once you know it’s on the way, it’s hard not to get impatient. Now the birds are back, so Spring really is here, even though it is currently snowing like crazy. Although we usually say that around here, Spring is really just that one week between Mud Season and Summer; don’t blink or you’ll miss it.

Pamela–I’ll be visiting your site! I confess to say _I_ never check out the URLs of people commenting, but my Mom checked out yours, and directed me to it. It seems we have more than one shared interest–sewing is my “true” love, and gardening just one of the many things I do on the side. (I love interesting buttons!)

–Talitha

Pamela March 22, 2005, 11:14 am

Hi there from still COLD Buffalo! LOL I am SO happy to have found your site…maybe i can learn how to extend my growing season and expand my crop-list!

When people want to find me they know to look for me,first in my Design Studio, if i am not there..i am in the garden!

I’ll be visiting frequently!

Gabrielle March 15, 2005, 3:33 pm

Aha! So March IS getting to you! Not that I blame you. Spring is well sprung here. Snow at this time of year would really get me down. I’ll send warm thoughts your way 🙂