What’s up, what’s down

– Posted in: Miscellaneous
0 comments

The snow banks are coming down; we can actually see grass in a few places. The Park’s Whopper and Gardener’s Delight tomatoes are just popping up, and can be put in a sunny window shortly, as are the Nagoya Flowering Kale seedlings. However, I’ve found an infestation of white fly on my large geranium plants ( I have quite a few) and am rinsing the plants off and then treating them with Hi-Yield DySyston, a systemic insecticide. I’ll probably need to treat all of them in that room, even though some aren’t affected yet, and also will wipe all the shelves with a Chorox solution, ans well as soaking the saucers.
I don’t really need this right now. Never had this before and wonder where it came from!
Outside, our work will begin with damage control – snow plowing does things to plantings. Being across from a school, we “sweep” sand and gravel from the lawn every spring.

About the Author

USDA Hardiness Zone: work in 3-5 Location: Home:small urban: work:homes and businesses Geographic type: hills, rocky outcroppings Soil type: gravelly soil – sand – sandy loam – silt – clay Experience level: professional 16 years Particular interests: design using perennials, annuals, shrubs and rock.

In its own way, frost may be one of the most beautiful things to happen in your garden all year . . . Don’t miss it. Like all true beauty, it is fleeting. It will grace your garden for but a short while this morning. . . . For this moment, embrace frost as the beautiful gift that it is.

~Philip Harnden in A Gardener’s Guide to Frost: Outwit the Weather and Extend the Spring and Fall Seasons

Comments on this entry are closed.