Roses & black spot

– Posted in: Plant info

Good link. But they neglect to mention that many antique roses are black spot resistant as well. I’ve never sprayed a rose for black spot, and my family has always grown roses. I’m under the impression that the tendency to black spot susceptiblity came into rose breeding with Chinas & thence into teas and then modern hybrids. I could be wrong. But I don’t grow any teas (too dicey in a climate with -20F temps in the winter) and the only rose I have which gets it is a David Austin I bought in a fit of greed in seeing its flowers. The rugosas, bless ’em, are nearly immune. My antiques are too. And the lovely books on roses by Martyn & Rix, and Peter Beales, give lists of immune/ resistant/ tolerant/ weeny varieties. Those books will however make you less resistant to buying more roses.

About the Author

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4b/5aLocation: rural; just south of British Columbia/Idaho borderGeographic type: foot of Black & Clifty Mountains (foothills of Rockies–the Wet Columbia Mountains in BC climate- speak)Soil type:acid sand (glacial lake bed)/coniferous forestExperience level: intermediate/professionalParticular interests: fragrant & edible plants, hardy bulbs, cottage gardening, alpines, peonies, penstemons & other blue flowers, primulas, antique & species roses & iris; nocturnal flowers Also: owner of Paradise Gardens Rare Plant Nursery

Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.

~Albert Camus in Albert Camus quotations

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